New Growden marriage discovery

I’ve found a possible marriage in FreeBMD for Elizabeth Ann Growden (RIN 3976), my great-grandfather’s older sister.

Marriages Mar 1869   (>99%)
GROWDEN     Elizabeth Ann          Bodmin     5c    122
Kendall           Nicholas Dunn     Bodmin     5c    122
PARSONS     Elizabeth                Bodmin     5c    122
Sturtridge          Thomas                Bodmin     5c    122

It seems to be confirmed by FreeCen 1871:

Piece: RG10/2268 Place: Mevagissey -Cornwall Enumeration District: 1
Civil Parish: Mevagissey Ecclesiastical Parish: -
Folio: 13 Page: 18 Schedule: 105

Where her age fits with Elizabeth Ann Growden (b. 1849)

They are in the 1871 Census as Kendall, but in the 1881 Census the spelling is Kendle, which appears to be an enumerator’s or transcriber’s mistake. I could find no trace of them in the 1891 census — perhaps they had moved away, or it hasn’t been fully transcribed yet.

My great-grandfather, William Matthew Growden (he later used the spelling Growdon, as did all his South African descendants) came to the Cape Colony in about 1876 to build the railway line from East London  to the interior.

At the time of the 1861 Census he was living at 3 Higher Bore Street, Bodmin, aged 10, with his father Matthew, aged 61, his mother Christiana, aged 51, his step-brother Thomas Pope, aged 23, his sister Elizabeth Ann (12), and brothers Mark (7) and Simeon (5).

Higher Bore Street, Bodmin, Cornwall (Photo taken 5 May 2005).

His brother Simeon died a couple of years later at the age of 8, and Mark died at the age of 28, within a few months of his marriage to Elizabeth Dymond. So I didn’t expect to find any relatives from that generation, so it was quite exciting to find a possible marriage for great-grand aunt Elizabeth Ann, and they appear to have had four children by the 1881 census, so there are possibly more third cousins just waiting to be discovered!

Not far from Higher Bore Street is Scarlett’s Well, where the family lived at the 1851 census, and I can imagine the children playing in these leafy lanes after school, or helping their father gather wood (which, as a woodman, was how he earned his living).

ScarWell

Near Scarlett's Well, Bodmin

James W. Growden Award

This item from an Alaskan newspaper mentions the James W. Growden award.

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner – entry Lathrop honors top students =:

At the Lathrop Celebration of Excellence awards ceremony Wednesday night, Keegan Severns received the James W. Growden Award, which goes to the top student athlete at the high school.

In recent years, former Lathrop basketball coach Joe Tremarello has made the presentation, including a description of Growden’s achievements. Growden was a star Fairbanks athlete in the 1950s who became a coach in Valdez. He died, along with his two sons, in the 1964 earthquake.

I believe there is also a Growden Memorial Park in Alaska, presumably also named after him.

James Wilson Growden was born in 1935, the youngest son of William Nelson Growden. James was my fourth cousin. I believe that his daughter Ronda survived (it was not the earthquake that killed James and his sons, but they had gone down to the harbour to watch the fishing boats land their catches, and were drowned by the resulting tsnunami).

William Nelson Growden was born in Tennessee, and worked in government service in Alaska. He was the son of Arthur Matthew Growden, who was born in Dunedin, New Zealand. Much of this information I got from Monica Louise Deragowski of New Orleans, who was a first cousin of James Wilson Growden, and was very interested in the family history, and corresponded with Growdens all over the world. I’ve been trying to continue her work, and see if I can find links between all the Growden families, so I’m very interested in news items, like the one above, that mention the Growden family history.

Canadian Growden family redux

It’s nearly three years since I wrote to several members of the Growden family in Canada, asking about the history of their branch of the family, but haven’t had any replies. It seems that none of them are interested in the family history.

I have managed to find a bit more from public records, like censuses and so on.

James Growden, who was born in Bodmin, Cornwall, England, emigrated to Canada in 1857 at the age of 20. He was my great grandfather’s first cousin. He married Harriet Baldwin and settled in Lindsay, Ontario, where he worked as a bricklayer.

They had five sons and three daughters, and several of their children married and had children of their own. One of the daughters, Florence, married a William McKay.

I hope any Ontario Growdens who read this will get in touch — we are probably related, and it would be good to share family information.

Calling all Growdens

Here’s a call to all members of the Growden / Growdon family to help us find links between our families.

If you go to the Growden discussion forum you can find a database where we are trying to collect Growden links.

If you have any Growdons or Growdens in your family, please try to enter at least one parent-child link in the database. If you don’t want to enter your own information there because of privacy concerns, please at least add some dead relatives.

Tim Growden, on the Growden Group on Facebook, recently asked: “Is there a chance that we could figure out some sort of family tree, i know my dad would appreciate it”.

Well, here is a way to figure out some sort of family tree — if every Growden/Growdon contributes to the database.

I’m doing a one-name study on Growden/Growdon, and I hope to link the major family branches together before I die.

You will have to join the forum before you can see the database or add to it. If you are already a member of the forum, you can see the database here.

It’s hip to be classical

The Mark Growden sextet have teamed with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestrato provide a nightclub after the concert, according to the Contra Costa Times:

S.F. Symphony is deeply involved in a new initiative called Davies After Hours. It launches March 20, right after the last strains of Brahms’ Fourth Symphony die away in the concert hall. Adventurous audience members who troop up to the second-tier lobby will find it transformed into an impromptu nightclub, with tables and specialty cocktails awaiting. Guest artists Alex Kelly and Friends will entertain, providing their own musical reflections on the evening’s classical program. Kelly is a Bay Area-based cellist and composer who has performed and recorded with all kinds of ensembles — from jazz to rock, avant-garde to classical, even klezmer — all over the United States and Canada. His “Friends” for the evening are the other members of the Bay Area’s Mark Growden Sextet — multi-intrumentalist and vocalist Growden, trumpeter Chris Grady, guitarist Myles Boisen and percussionists Seth Ford-Young and Jenya Chernoff.

Mark Growden is a composer, multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, visual artist, educator, cyclist, and father based in San Francisco, CA, and has a tribe of followers.

I haven’t found a link between his Growden family and mine yet — he is descended from Martin Buckner Growden, son of Francis Neil Growden, son of Francis Neil Growdon of Ohio, descended from William B. Growden and Ann Cocker of Warleggan-St Neot in Cornwall.

Growdens visit Athenian Krewe

The following news item mentions Lori Murphy and Brad Growden, members of our Growden family from New Orleans.
clipped from www.montgomeryadvertiser.com
As the Krewe of Athenians called on guests to attend its 59th annual ball, members were honored to be the first mystic so­ciety in the area to host a pre­sentation of debutantes at the Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa at the Convention Center.
The special event, “Athenian Renaissance: A Debutante Ball hosted in Three Acts,” was planned to meticulous detail. Highlights included a humor­ous skit and a majestic presenta­tion ceremony in the Montgom­ery Performing Arts Centre and a long night of celebration in the hotel’s grand ballroom.
Special guests from New Or­leans included Lori and Rick Murphy; Marie and Brad Growden; Cindy Roth; and Andree and John Hainkel.
blog it

Lori and Brad are descended from Arthur Franklin (Frank) Growden, who emigrated from New Zealand to the USA, and has descendants in Tennessee, New Orleans, Alaska and other places in the US.

Homeless shelter overflowing

Jim Growden, Baptist minister in Tullahoma, Tennessee, is involved in the running of a shelter for homeless people.
clipped from www.manchestertimes.com
As unemployment hovers near eight percent nationwide, the Shepherd’s House board of directors and its volunteers continue to serve the homeless in Coffee County and the surrounding area.

Staff members of the Shepherd’s House, located at 712 First Ave., Tullahoma, are the Rev. Jim Growden, director; Carol Growden, assistant director; and Terri Beard, house manager.

Between Jan. 1 and Dec. 10, 2008 the house served as a temporary shelter for 209 people, according to the Rev. Jim Growden, director.

blog it

Jim Growden is my (Steve Hayes) third cousin once removed. Jim was educated at Tullahoma High School, Motlow State Community College, Belmont University, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary and Trinity Theological Seminary. He spent 10 years in the US Marine Corps, and entered the ministry in 1968, and became pastor of Westwood Baptist Church, Manchester, Tennessee in 1999.

He is the son of Arthur Franklin Growden and Flora Myers. He and his wife Carol have two sons.

Growdens in St Neot

I went to LDS Family History Centre in Parktown and looked at St Neot burial records. and found the deaths of Joseph and Elizabeth Growden (nee Cocker).

There were also several Growden children, I presume their grandchildren, who died in a typhus epidemic that struck St Neot around 1830. There was a dramatic increase in the number of burials in that year.

Jack Fingleton by Greg Growden

Greg Growden is better known as a rugby writer, but it seems that he writes about cricket too. I’m not sure which branch of the Growden family he belongs to — does anybody know? Several branches of the Growdens went to Australia.
clipped from www.cricketweb.net
In 1991 I stumbled across a little paperback book called A Wayward Genius by Greg Growden. I had never heard of the author, but the subject matter being discussed was that of ‘Chuck’ Fleetwood-Smith a colourful Test cricketer from the 1930s. The small book was consumed in one sitting (224 pages) and I was mightily impressed with the author.

For the next few years I would check the new cricket books at summer time, and keep my eye out for any new offerings from Growden. After a while I gave up hope of any new books until I walked into my local bookshop last week and found a beautifully presented hardback book titled Jack Fingleton by Greg Growden.
Seventeen years is a long break between books, but like the acting of Jack Nicholson, the writing of Growden has improved with age.
blog it

Linking the Growdens

I spent another few hours in the LDS family history centre in Johannesburg yesterday looking at marriage registers for St Neot, Cornwall.

I knew that some Growdens came from there through my third cousin once removed, Monica Louise Deragowski of New Orleans, USA.

When we started researching our family history we didn’t know anything about the Growdens (though ours all used the spelling Growdon) beyond the fact that my great grandfather William Matthew Growden came to the Cape Colony from Cornwall and worked on the railways, first as a platelayer, and then as a permanent way inspector.

I found some British phone books in the Durban public library, made a list of the Growdons in Cornwall and Devon, and wrote to them. I got a reply from a Mrs K. Growdon in Brixham, Devon, and she said that she had had a letter from Monica Louise Deragowski asking about the Growdon family. So I wrote to her, and we corresponded for about 15 years until she died in 1993. She had written to Growdons all over the world, and sent me some information from a Sylvia Reebel in Pennsylvania, who had traced her Growden ancestors to the St Neot and Warleggan parishes in Cornwall.

Sylvia Reebel was connected to them, but her family didn’t seem to be connected to ours. What was interesting was that they had the same names, almost.

On Sylvia Reebel’s side there was a William Growden who married Ann Cocker and had children

William born 1784
Joseph born 1789
Jane born 1790
Matthew born 1792
Elizabeth born 1795
John born 1797
Thomas born 1800

On our side there was William Growden who married Elizabeth Saundercock at Cardinham, and had children:

Jennifer born 1793
William born 1794 (Monica Deragowski’s great grandfather)
Joseph born 1796
Thomas born 1798
Matthew born 1800 (my great great grandfather)
Ann born 1802
Joanna born 1804
Jenifer born 1806
Elizabeth born 1807
John born 1811

The boys’ names match — there was

William, Joseph, Matthew, John and Thomas in one family
William, Joseph, Thomas, Matthew John in the other

There are similarities in the girls’ names too, though not as great. The similarity might, of course, indicate nothing more than that those were popular names at the time, but it could also indicate that they were family names perpetuated down the generations.

There might have been difficulty telling them apart in later life had the first lot not emigrated to Pennsylvania and married and died there.

What I’m trying to do is put all the Growdens and Growdons I find into one Growdon file, and gradually link them up. I’ve got a long way to go yet, but if we collect all the snippets of information together, eventually we might join together different parts of the jigsaw puzzle.

If you’re a Growden or a Growdon or have Growden relatives, please consider joining our Growden forum, and trying to make the links.

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