Tombstone Tuesday: earliest Sandercock

Here is the gravestone of the earliest Sandercock ancestor we have managed to find:

In memory of William Sandercock
who departed this life
the 25th day of November 1786 Aged 80
And in memory of Mary his wife who died July the 2
1786 aged 81.

Grave of William and Mary Sandercock, Cardinham, Cornwall

Grave of William and Mary Sandercock, Cardinham, Cornwall

William Sandercock is the 5th Great-Grandfather of Dr Stephen Tromp Wynn Hayes

Common Ancestor

* William Sandercock
(Abt 1705-1786)
* Mary Verran
(1707-1786)
Married 25 Jan 1729
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* Thomas Sandercock
(Abt 1737-1825)
Ann Couch
(1739-1817)
Married 1 Jun 1761
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William Growden
(Abt 1764- )
* Elizabeth Couch Saundercock
(1766- )
Married 26 Nov 1792
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* Matthew Growden
(1800-Cir 1883)
Christiana Dyer
(Abt 1810-Bef 1881)
Married 10 Dec 1844
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* William Matthew Growdon
(1851-1913)
Elizabeth Greenaway
(1842-1927)
Married 2 Aug 1868
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* George Growdon
(1873-1948)
Janet McCartney Hannan
(1882-1946)
Married 2 Jun 1909
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Frank Wynn Hayes
(1907-1988)
* Ella Growdon
(1910-1983)
Married 24 Jun 1933
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* Dr Stephen Tromp Wynn Hayes
(1941- )

There is more on this family on our family Wiki pages. If you are related to this family, please visit the family Wiki and contribute something to the story there. Anecdotes and other material about the descendants of William and Mary Sandercock are welcome.

Tombstone Tuesday: More Sandercocks

Henry Sandercock tombstone in Cardinham Churchyard

Henry Sandercock tombstone in Cardinham Churchyard

Henry Sandercock was a blacksmith in Cardinham, Cornwall, and was my second cousin three tiems removed. After his death his sons and wife emigrated to Queensland, Australia, and some of their descendants are still living there today.

I’ve been doing quite a bit of work on the Sandercock family in the last week, trying to fill in some of the gaps. It seems to have been confined mainly to Cornwall and Devon until the mid-19th century, when some emigrated to other countries, or moved to other parts of Britain.

This particular Sandercock family is related to all our Growden family — the earliest Growdon in our line we know of is William Growden who married Elizabeth Sandercock in Cardinham in 1792, so this whole Saundercock line is related to our whole Growden line.

There are other Sandercock families from other villages in Cornwall, who may or may not be related. They come from St Gennys, Launceston, Tintagel and St Teath.

The surname is sometimes spelt Saundercock, but that is less common. Other variant spellings are Sanderlock and Sandercott.

Tombstone Tuesday: Sandercock, Cardinham

Sandercock tombstone in Cardinham churchyard, Cornwall

Sandercock tombstone in Cardinham churchyard, Cornwall

Charlotte Sandercock, wife of Richard Sandercock, and daughter of George and Catherine Riddle.

We’re not sure if they are related to us, but we do have related Sandercocks who lived in Cardinham.

Kerry Greene in hospital after accident

Val’s sister Elaine Machin has just phoned to say that their cousin Alan Greene’s youngest daughter Kerry, aged 18, is seriously ill in hospital after a car accident, and is in intensive care. They live in Port Elizabeth.

Keeping in touch with emigrants

I’ve been reading The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History and one of the articles raised the question of how long families that have emigrated keep in touch with those back in the country they came from.

Most of  of our ancestral lines have immigrants from somewhere else, and it is quite interesting to look at how they maintained contact, and how and to what extent we have re-established contact, mainly because of an interest in family history. A recent post about a Canadian Growden family is a case in point — they seem to have little or no contact with any other branches of the family, and little or no memory of where they came from.

Pearson-Ellwood

One of the clearest cases is Val’s maternal grandmother’s family. She was Martha Pearson, nee Ellwood, and both she and her husband William Walker Pearson. They came to South Africa from Whitehaven, Cumberland, England about a century ago, and were married in Pinetown, Natal, in 1913. They lived just down the road from Val when she was young, within walking distance, and when her grandfather died her grandmother came to live in a granny flat that they built on to their house in Escombe, where she lived with them for 12 years until she died in 1968.

So Val grew up with her grandmother’s stories of Whitehaven, and Martha (Mattie) Pearson kept in touch with her brothers and sisters who lived there, and some of them had also married into the Pearson family. During the Second World War some of Val’s mother’s cousins were soldiers, and visited when troopships called at Durban on the way to south-east Asia. Martha Pearson occasionally returned to Whitehaven to visit family, and we have some of her old passports. Val’s mother and aunt went with her as teenagers, and remembered some of their English cousins, though they did not stay in touch with them. Val and her sister visited England in 1971, and passed through Whitehaven, and had thought of visiting relatives there, but it was late and they thought they were old and would already be in bed, so they drove through.

When we got married in 1974, six years after Val’s grandmother had died, and became interested in family history, one of the starting points was some of Val’s relics from her grandmother — her birthday book, cuttings of newspaper marriage and death notices, and obituaries of her father Thomas Ellwood (1845-1914)  and grandfather John Ellwood (1819-1892). We wrote to the Whitehaven News, asking if any members of the family still living in Whitehaven would get in touch. From that we discovered that Val’s great-uncle Ernie Pearson had died the previous week. But his daughter-in-law Nora Pearson wrote to us regularly for the next thirty years, keeping us in touch with news of the family, so the contact was maintained for another generation, and thirty years later, in 2005 we visited Nora, and her daughters who live in Edinburgh. Whether our children will keep in touch with their children after we die remains to be seen. We also visited another second cousin who lives in Wales.

But our letter to the Whitehaven News also brought contact with a forgotten generation of emigrants, about whom Val had heard no stories as a child. A Mrs Mary Ann Tumilty, nee Ellwood,  had been visiting Whitehaven from the USA in the week that our letter was published, and when she got home she wrote to us, and sent extracts from the Ellwood family Bible, which she had, and it gave all the children of John Ellwood, Val’s great great grandfather, who was born in 1819. Mary Ann Tumilty’s parents had lived in Northumberland, and emigrated to the USA in 1923.

Hayes-Stooke

On this side of the family I’ve told in another post how my father visited England for a Scout jamboree, and met a cousin with the unusual name of Herrick Hayes, and that helped us to make contact with second cousins that we had not previously known about, though attempts to make contact with Herrick Hayes’s descendants have so far been unsuccessful.

In general it seems that, unless there is a conscious interest in family history, contact seems to be lost in the generation of the great grandchildren of immigrants, and family history research can lead to the re-establishing of contact.

Julia Bridget Hayes – ikonographer

Sell Art OnlineOur daughter Bridget the ikonographer has set up a web page to display her
ikons
.

She has been painting ikons for several years now, and is using them to
finance her studies in Greece (she is studying for a doctorate in theology at
Athens University).

Canadian Growden family redux

It’s nearly three years since I wrote to several members of the Growden family in Canada, asking about the history of their branch of the family, but haven’t had any replies. It seems that none of them are interested in the family history.

I have managed to find a bit more from public records, like censuses and so on.

James Growden, who was born in Bodmin, Cornwall, England, emigrated to Canada in 1857 at the age of 20. He was my great grandfather’s first cousin. He married Harriet Baldwin and settled in Lindsay, Ontario, where he worked as a bricklayer.

They had five sons and three daughters, and several of their children married and had children of their own. One of the daughters, Florence, married a William McKay.

I hope any Ontario Growdens who read this will get in touch — we are probably related, and it would be good to share family information.

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